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Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
in our economy. >> joining me today, "washington post" columnist jonathan capehart, former white house press secretary and founding partner off-almost said founding father -- founding father and partner of inside agency robert gibbs, congressional reporter for buzz feed and political reporter and white house correspondent at the "huffington post" sam stein. we talked a lot about the pizza versus the pizza box. after the gop autopsy, the republican conviction they didn't actually need to change the product they were selling, they just needed to change the marketing. it's unbelievable me, the whole 47% thing clearly has not made a dent. nowhere do you see that in a more pronounced fashion than republican talking points on unemployment. >> largely, if you ask most members of the gop, 47% to them wasn't a gaffe, it's a belief. i heard it in debates i had with people all of last year before the tape was uncovered. i do think, look, this is one of those things that the republicans will either learn this the easy way or the hard way. i remember watching these debates about unemployment insura
'm joined by jonathan capehart, and john rosen that will, founder of stop handgun violence. i'll start with you, jonathan capehart. before we discuss the situation, i want the to ask about a joint statement today made by the family of newtown's victims. after thanking people for their kindness and thoughts at this time, they suggested the best way to help on saturday would be to perform an act of charity. i think that's something many people can relate to. and yet there are so many who think this is a time to also think about other collective action, including policy change. >> yes. well, you can understand, if you've met any of the families, the newtown families, you can understand, you know that the pain from a year ago is still very much -- very much present, very much on the surface. and so their desire, one for privacy, and two, for acts of kindness or charity, are understandable. but we also have to understand that there are people out there who have been fighting for gun violence reduction, changes in gun policies that would make it possible for there to be, you know, more safet
and a regular on fox. jonathan, good to see you. okay, should the minimum wage be increased and should it be the same across the country, state by state, i'm talking about. if not, what would you base it on, market to market, let's start there, jonathan. >> well, wages are not arbitrary. they're not based on whim and feeling. they're actually based on productivity and the demand for supply and labor. so the wages, resulting in job losses, especially among the fast food works working in this job. and the finding about minimum wage was the determination of the labor department back in 1938 when the first minimum wage was enacted. in effect, it is discrimination, it says to a low skilled worker if you can't produce at $15 an hour you can't produce at all. and of course, it says to the employer you can't hire them either. so it is a lose/lose event for all, and a loss of jobs. >> let's go here, to the heritage foundation, saying increasing memory wage would hurt the jobs and the economy. again, so you seem to agree with that particular proposal? >> and it hurts the workers, as well. i mean
on our politics before setting foot on our soil. here's jonathan karl with more. on how mandela prodded, consoles, scolded, and inspired american presidents. >> reporter: nelson mandela loomed large in america long before he was freed from prison. ♪ it was 25 years ♪ that take that man away >> reporter: inspiring a mass movement against racism and intolerance. >> apartheid, no. >> freedom, yes. >> reporter: his relationship with u.s. presidents has been far more complicated. when he was locked up in 1962, the u.s. government was silent. in 1966, bobby kennedy went to south africa and took a stand against racism. giving the greatest speech he ever delivered. >> each time a man stands up for an ideal, he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope. >> reporter: from lbj to nixon to jimmy carter, south africa's apartheid government was actually a u.s. ally in the cold war. as the anti-apartheid movement grew, a young college student named barack obama was inspired by mandela to give his first political speech. the man in the white house then said no to sanctions. against south africa, insisting
a short time ago. jonathan karl, certainly president obama made aware of the news, the loss this afternoon. have we heard anything yet from the president? >> the white house is well aware of this, something we have been tracking a long time. no official statement yet. was a towering influence on president obama, inspiration. if you look now at the screen, that is the one and only photograph of president obama and mandela together, happening the one time that manned -- that obama got to meet his hero as a young freshman senator, newly elected senator, and mandela was visiting washington. he had that meeting, that single photo, obama in silhouette. he wassident, back when senator obama, wrote a forward to a book by nelson mandela, and the words here give you a sense. by the way, the pictures right now, that is the president in the cell where nelson mandela spent 17 years in prison and in south africa, 17 of the 27 years that nelson mandela spent in prison. trip, the president visited south africa earlier this year. he had hoped to get a chance to have one last meeting with mandela. forela wa
. >> in 1990, nelson mandela visited new york city. thousands gathered in harlem to hear him speak. jonathan martin is there to tell us about that and what the scene is like tonight. >> a lot of people remember it like it was yesterday, they remember the day in 1990 when the new york city mayor invited nelson mandela to the city. one of the first places he stopped was in harlem. there was a lot of anticipation, excitement, thousands of people came. earlier tonight the apollo theatre had a mark key lit up. the lights went out. it said, "in memory of nelson mandela we remember and love you." a lot of people remember when he came in 1990 it was a big part of the visit. it said welcome home mr and mrs nelson mandela. one of the people who remembered that was the historian, mr billy mitchell. we talked about what that day was like in his memory. >> he was fully aware that all the people from civil rights fighters and to have his preps here, it meant a lot to all of us coming up out of problems. we were going through housing, education, things that of nature. his presence made us feel good, that t
by introducing our witnesses. our first witness is jonathan turley, a professor of public interest law at george washington university law school. professor turley is a nationally recognized legal scholar who has written extensively in areas ranging from constitutional law to legal theory. he has published over three dozen academic articles and over 750 articles in newspapers. professor turley has been recognized as the second most cited law professor in the country. our second witness is nicholas rosenkranz, a professor of law at georgetown. professor rosenkranz has served and advise to the federal government in a variety of capacities including as a law clerk to a supreme court justice and as an attorney advisor to the justice department office of legal counsel. he has published numerous scholarly articles including the subjects of the constitution, which is the single most downloaded article about constitutional interpretation in the history of the social science research network. our third witness is simon lazarus, a senior counsel with the constitutional accountability center. he is a membe
it. >> your book is called "heart." you wrote it with dr. jonathan reiner. mr. vice president, thank you very much. >> thank you. enjoy the show. >> and merry christmas. we might not see you between now and the ends of the month. >> take care. >>> let's go over to heather nauert. >> good morning. enjoy all that snow in wyoming back home. got some headlines now to bring you. let's take a live look. andrews air force base, president obama and the first lady -- we just saw this moments ago, they just took off on air force one. they're on their way to south africa to pay tribute to nelson mandela. tomorrow's national memorial service will serve as a rare reunion of nearly all the living american presidents. president george w. bush and laura bush, also on that plane. and secretary clinton on the plane. president clinton and jimmy carter traveling separately. president george h.w. bush is the only living president not to attend. the 89-year-old is no longer able to travel such long distances. >>> iraq war veteran brutally gunned down while christmas shopping for his parents. 32-year-old n
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)